Abandoned Water Park

We finally made it out to this little gem in the middle of the desert.  The roadtrip getting here was super fun and we loved every minute of it 🙂  We headed out of town, Friday (early evening) after the hubby got off work.  We decided to leave at night, so that we could sleep in town and then hit the ground running – bright and early!  But like literally….we were up and at ’em before the sun even rose.

When we arrived we strapped on our GoPro’s and our grabbed camera bag/backpack.  Now we were ready to explore this beauty!  Since it was just before 7am and already 80+ degrees, we kinda did a fast paced explore lol.  Below are a few photographs and snapshots from the GoPro.

LOCATION HISTORY: The Lake Dolores Waterpark opened in May 1962. Park attendance peaked in the early 1970’s. However as patron attendance started to decline in the late 1980’s, and the park closed. In 1990 the park was sold, and reopened as Rock-A-Hoola Waterpark on July 4, 1998 – featuring a 50’s & 60’s theme. Over the next 3-4 years the park amassed over $3M debt and an employee who was crippled [in a 1999 accident] was awarded $4.4M in damages. In 2000 Rock-A-Hoola Waterpark filed for bankruptcy. The park reopened as Discovery Waterpark in May 2002 after $400k in renovations were made. Throughout the next few years the park was opened intermittently, finally closing in the summer of 2004.

 

Jesuit School

Got up super early on a much deserved day off, to go explore with the hubby and a friend.  We bundled up and headed out into the 36 degree winter weather for our morning explore of an abandoned school.

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The decaying campus in the hills were once home to a sawmill, several elegant estates, busy Jesuit college and a small Christian school.  The property used to bustle with activity. It was originally a sawmill site that fueled the growth of the nearby towns, now submerged by a reservoir. In the late 1800s, a wealthy miner built a 15-room house and developed orchards and a commercial trout farm there. It expanded still further when purchased by the son of another wealthy miner.

Since its abandonment more than three decades ago, the site has been reclaimed by nature. Termites and rodents have moved into rooms that once held students. Ivy climbs its crumbling brick walls. A once-elegant fountain is now a planter box filled with foliage. The wind whispers through broken windows of the former library.


The majority of the buildings that we explored today were built between 1940-1950 and completely deserted in the 1970’s.